How has Oham been conceived, structured and built up? Which is its inner structure?

Oham is based on this thought: in a quite general way, every Hebrew word belongs to one of the following eight parts:

  1. Part N, consisting only of root letters.

  2. Part P, consisting of root letters that are preceded by a Prefix.

  3. Part I, consisting of root letters between which an Infix has been inserted.

  4. Part S, consisting of root letters with an added Suffix.

  5. Part PI, consisting of root letters with a Prefix and an Infix.

  6. Part IS, consisting of root letters with an Infix and a Suffix.

  7. Part PS, consisting of root letters with a Prefix and a Suffix.

  8. Part PIS, consisting of root letters with a Prefix, an Infix and a Suffix.

But Hebrew words can consist of one root letter, of two root letters or of three root letters.

Words consisting of one root letter are called words m

Words consisting of two root letters are called words d

Words consisting of three root letters are called words t.

Remark: Hebrew words consisting of only a root consonant do exist in isolation only for study purposes. In the practice they are prefixed to other words or themselves take a suffix... We could list within this word kind -one root consonant- prepositions like בּ, ל, מ, the conjunctions ו, ש, the article ה and a few others.

A similar thing occurs in English:

There are in English words consisting of two letters: me, he, it, of, do...

and words consisting of three letters: dog, eye, man, sky, ink...

Once this becomes clear, the path to the mastering of Hebrew has lost a deal of the fearful haunting ideas in the learners' mind.

As for practical purposes this are the links that open the corresponding Indexes:

Part and Section Shortening
N-d
N-t
P-m
P-d
P-t
I-d
I-t1
I-t2
S-m
S-d
S-t
PI-d
PI-t1
PI-t2
IS-d
IS-t1
IS-t2
PS-m
PS-d
PS-t
PIS-d
PIS-t1
PIS-t2

So, remember: